Obama waging an ‘endless campaign’,” blares The Hill, which quotes a Democratic strategist saying when it comes to the president, “stump-style appearances are ‘what he’s best at.’” Here are some things we wish the president was better at (and that would be more productive) than stump speeches:

  • Submitting a serious plan to replace his sequester with spending cuts and reforms that help balance the budget within a decade. Republicans have already passed two bills replacing the sequester proposed and insisted on by the president. But Congressional Budget Office (CBO) Director Doug Elmendorf says they “have not seen a specific proposal” for replacement from the White House. And Senate Democrats haven’t passed anything either -- even the New York Times panned the proposal they’ve floated as “more a bargaining position than a solution.”
  • Growing our economy and cutting spending. The economy is in a rut: the unemployment rate has been stuck near or above eight percent for years, prices are rising, and wages are stagnant. But if the State of the Union message is any indication, the president wants more of the same: more tax hikes, more spending, and more regulations that make it harder for small businesses to hire.
  • Delivering a responsible budget to Congress on time. His budgets have been late four out of five times, the most of any president. When he finally submitted a budget last year, it received zero votes -- his own party voted against it unanimously. The House passed the bipartisan Require a PLAN Act (H.R. 444) by Rep. Tom Price (R-GA) to force President Obama to submit a budget that shows when it will balance and outlines the steps needed to make that happen.
  • Approving popular energy projects like Keystone XL that would create thousands of jobs. The Keystone XL pipeline would help create thousands of new jobs. But despite broad support among the public and Congress (House and Senate), the president rejected and personally lobbied against it. And after more than four years of consideration, the administration says a final decision will now “languish until mid-June,” Reuters recently reported.