According to a survey by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the president’s health care law is now “the biggest concern for small businesses”:

  • “71% say the law makes it harder for them to hire more employees,” according to the Chamber survey. “32% of small businesses plan to reduce hiring as a result of the employer mandate, and 31% will cut back hours to reduce the number of full time employees.”
  • “77% say the health care law will make coverage for their employees more expensive.” Given these rising costs, the Wall Street Journal reports that some small businesses may be forced into “increasing employees' share of the premiums,” or will have to “stay under the 50 full-time employee threshold or deliberately turn full-time workers into part-timers.” Some say it “makes more sense to drop insurance entirely and pay a penalty…”
  • The administration even botched implementing part of the law meant to help small businesses specifically. Instead of allowing small businesses “to provide workers with a choice of health plans,” the New York Times says employees will now “be limited to a single plan.”

But what’s bad for small businesses is great for government bureaucrats. Since ObamaCare “could be as daunting as doing your taxes,” the administration wants “[t]ens of thousands of health care professionals, union workers and community activists hired as ‘navigators’” to help Americans “navigate” the law. These “navigators” might even be quizzing people on their voter registration.

Fewer jobs, higher prices, less access to coverage -- and more bureaucrats … as the Ways & Means Committee put it, “it leaves you wondering, what’s next?”

The balanced budget passed by Republicans would repeal and defund the president’s health care law, and lays the groundwork for better, patient-centered reforms. Will the budget released by President Obama this week address the challenges posed by his health care law? We’ll find out in two days.