This week, Speaker Ryan signed another Congressional Review Act bill. This one repeals the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) anti-arbitration rule, which inhibits the ability of consumers to resolve disputes outside of the courtroom. The rule benefits wealthy trial lawyers at the expense of consumers and repealing it is the right call for regular people. Read more about the rule and our legislation to repeal it here. (Also pictured, from left to right: Rep. Hensarling (R-TX), Rep.

The Survivors’ Bill of Rights Act, introduced by Rep. Mimi Walters (R-CA) and Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), has a simple goal: to protect the rights of sexual assault survivors.

The next time someone uses the outdated expression "do-nothing Congress," be sure to forward them this email. The work of the people's House does not always make for the best prime time TV, but it is always steady and ongoing. And these days, it's been marked by a lot of real, common-sense progress. (But then again, you probably already knew that because of all the positive stories in your newsfeed. . . no?)

Regardless, here are eight bills that Congress recently sent to the president's desk. Every single one of them are now law.

If you're planning on flying anywhere during your summer vacation—or really any time at all in the next year or so—then this bill that Speaker Ryan signed and sent to the president is for you.

Last week, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed the Global Food Security Act (S. 1252). This common sense legislation will save lives by combatting hunger and malnutrition in disaster areas around the globe. And it will do all that without increasing spending by a single dime. In fact, it requires a results-based approach for U.S.

On day one as Speaker of the House of Representatives, Paul Ryan made it clear: "We need to make some changes, starting with how the House does business." Regular order isn't always sexy, but under Speaker Ryan and the House Republican majority, it is steady and ongoing. Here are 10 photos from May that show that progress in action, featuring seven bills that have already been signed into law.

This is a jobs bill and a reform bill. It will make sure that our small manufacturers have better access to the tax relief they need.

Speaker Ryan signs a bill to help fund the Bulletproof Vest Program for police officers.

It's a selfless—and sometimes thankless—job. But every day, law-enforcement officers all across America put on the badge and get to work to keep our communities safe. They've got our backs. And we should have theirs. 

That's why Congress passed (unanimously!) two important bills last week that:

last year, the administration stripped these female pioneers of their eligibility to have their remains placed at Arlington National Cemetery, America's most hallowed ground. Yesterday, with a bill sponsored by Rep. Martha McSally (R-AZ) sponsored and signed by Speaker Ryan, Congress took a tremendous step towards restoring inurnment rights for WASPs at Arlington.

It's not every day that you get to sign your own bill to send to the president's desk to become law, but that's exactly what Speaker Ryan did this week when he signed H.R. 1831, an anti-poverty bill he authored with Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA).

As Speaker Ryan explained to his kids, after Congress passes a bill, the speaker of the House and the president pro tempore of the Senate both sign it before sending it to the White House for the president's final signature into law.

Pages