Lifting the ban would offer new markets for U.S. oil and mean fewer layoffs. ... This should be an easy win for jobs and U.S. global influence.

The president’s policies aren’t delivering the strong, sustained economic growth families need to get ahead.

"BCG, the Boston consultancy, estimates the average cost to manufacture goods in the U.S. is now only 5% higher than in China and is actually 10% to 20% lower than in major European economies. Even more striking: BCG projects that by 2018 it will be 2% to 3% cheaper to make stuff here than in China."

While I described their draft plan as nuts, I believe this final plan is an expensive, arrogant insult to Americans who are struggling to make ends meet.

“This is now the weakest expansion we have had in 70 years,” said Megan Greene, chief economist at Manulife Asset Management.

Speaker Boehner called for ending the oil export ban – an antiquated policy born out of the 1970s “scarcity mindset” that is standing in the way of new jobs, lower gas prices, and stronger support for our allies.

By embracing our resources, we’ll keep energy prices affordable, help create jobs, and boost our economy.

It’s a vital industry, and this bill will ensure that it remains so by reducing uncertainty and empowering states – not the federal government – to do what best protects jobs and the environment.

The EPA is bent on furthering its regulatory agenda regardless of the costs to American families and consequences for American workers, and I’m pleased that the Supreme Court has finally said enough is enough.

New regulations on power producers alone could drive electricity bills up by double digits in some areas, compromise grid reliability, and destroy hundreds of thousands of jobs.

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