Because of recently-enacted Trade Promotion Authority, the American people have the chance to closely review this agreement and Congress must ensure it meets the highest standards before moving forward.

ere’s why numerous editorial boards and members of both parties support lifting the ban, and why President Obama should do the same.

If we make that our focus, we can continue to get things done for the people we serve.

We’ll continue advancing solutions that address Americans’ top priorities, and the president ought to work with us to get more of these bipartisan, common-sense initiatives signed into law.

Lifting the ban would offer new markets for U.S. oil and mean fewer layoffs. ... This should be an easy win for jobs and U.S. global influence.

The president’s policies aren’t delivering the strong, sustained economic growth families need to get ahead.

"BCG, the Boston consultancy, estimates the average cost to manufacture goods in the U.S. is now only 5% higher than in China and is actually 10% to 20% lower than in major European economies. Even more striking: BCG projects that by 2018 it will be 2% to 3% cheaper to make stuff here than in China."

“This is now the weakest expansion we have had in 70 years,” said Megan Greene, chief economist at Manulife Asset Management.

Speaker Boehner called for ending the oil export ban – an antiquated policy born out of the 1970s “scarcity mindset” that is standing in the way of new jobs, lower gas prices, and stronger support for our allies.

By embracing our resources, we’ll keep energy prices affordable, help create jobs, and boost our economy.

Pages