Democrats have long demanded that any increase in defense funding must be equally matched with more non-defense spending. That harmful precedent ends this week—a significant departure from the Obama years, and a big win for the new administration.

This fiscally-responsible legislation increases Capitol security, allows sledding on the Hill, and funds critical government oversight tools.

The president’s budget is not so much a budget as it is a progressive manual—a series of far-left proposals that would drive our country further into debt, stifle wage growth and job creation, and raise taxes on millions of hardworking Americans. (Read: make big government even bigger.)

Next Tuesday, President Obama is expected to submit his final budget proposal to Congress. Last year’s edition got a grand total of one vote in the Senate, so expectations aren’t high in these parts. And in year eight, we know what kind of proposal we can expect: a bloated budget that grows the government.

If only American workers were forking over bigger portions of their paychecks to the federal government. And if only there were more bureaucrats in Washington. Then the federal government could finally do its job, and do it right.

If the president actually wants our troops to get paid, he should stop calling strategy meetings of his shutdown caucus.

Flashback to January of 2011. John Boehner is newly elected as Speaker of the Republican-led House of Representatives, and the first week on the job, the House slashes $35 million from its own budget...with the promise of much more to come. Now fast forward to present day, and those taxpayer savings have grown to more than $782 million. All told, that's a 14% reduction in the cost of Congress.


After winning a majority in the House in November 2010, Republicans fought to reduce spending and return some fiscal sanity to the federal budget.  As part of the Budget Control Act in 2011, President Obama insisted on his sequester. Because of its indiscriminate cuts – including to the military – House Republicans passed two bills in 2012 to replace the president’s sequester with common-sense reductions and reforms.

Their plan is to block, filibuster, veto everything – starting with a pay raise for our troops – in order to extract more funding for the IRS and the EPA.
Now, four months into the new Congress, Republican majorities in the House and Senate worked together to pass the first joint 10-year balanced budget in 14 years.

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