The latest batch of Hillary Clinton’s work-related personal emails released by the State Department provides at least 125 examples of the former Secretary of State and her staff mishandling classified information. The emails further confirm that virtually everything Clinton has told Americans about her unprecedented email arrangement is absolutely, categorically false.

Questions about former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s exclusive use of personal email and a private server for government business – first exposed as part of the investigation by the House Select Committee on Benghazi – continue to grow.

The Washington Post reports:

The House Select Committee on Benghazi announced that Secretary Clinton will testify on October 22. Meanwhile, significant gaps in her email record remain, and her aides are still getting around to turning over their own personal yet work-related emails.

So now it depends upon what the meaning of the word “classified” is?

"Two inspector generals appointed by President Obama have now called on the Justice Department to investigate Secretary Clinton’s mishandling of classified email. If Secretary Clinton truly has nothing to hide, she can prove it by immediately turning over her server to the proper authorities and allowing them to examine the complete record."

When Secretary Clinton claims that everything she did was permitted, not only is she effectively blaming President Obama for allowing official government records to disappear, she is also contradicting the policies of her own State Department.

The Benghazi Select Committee released its March 4, 2015, subpoena of Clinton, proving she did not tell the truth when she said “I've never had a subpoena.”
If only Secretary of State John Kerry was as cooperative with congressional investigators as he is with Iran’s ayatollahs.

As Benghazi Select Committee Chairman Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC) told CBS News on Sunday, Hillary Clinton will testify as soon as the committee has what it needs to “have a constructive conversation with her.”

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