As scandals and crises engulfed the Obama administration last summer, outside observers began to openly wonder if the president and his team are up to the task of managing the government. A year later, it still looks that way:

This week, President Obama makes a pilgrimage to San Francisco that he’s made several times before, to raise cash at the mansion of an anti-affordable energy extremists who has made stopping Keystone his personal hobby

"He has cast his lot with environmental hysterics"

The president is just too close to environmental extremists to stand up for America’s workers. He’s too invested in left-fringe politics to do what presidents are called on to do, and that’s put the national interest first.

On January 21, 2009, The New York Times celebrated what it perceived as “an end to eight years of stark tension between science and government” and the start of a new era in which government officials no longer “insisted on tight control over even routine functions of key agencies.”

The paper’s inspiration was President Obama’s Inaugural Address, delivered the day before. America’s new chief executive proclaimed:

On Friday, nearly six and a half years after the application to build the Keystone XL pipeline was filed with the State Department, Speaker Boehner signed the bipartisan legislation, and the bill’s next stop will be the president’s desk.  President Obama has vowed to veto it for no good reason.

For at least 42,000 Americans, according to the administration’s own estimates, this project would mean the shot at a good-paying job and the ability to provide for their families.

It all goes to show the president is stuck on the same outdated, top-down ideas that haven’t worked.

CLAIM: “Imagine if we broke out of these tired old patterns.  Imagine if we did something different.” (President Obama, State of the Union address, January 20, 2015) 

SOTU FACT: Tonight, the president called for a better, more collaborative politics, and yet he has already threatened to veto four jobs bills that have passed the House with bipartisan support, including:  

“We’ve got an energy boom going on in this country,” Speaker Boehner said in a September 18th speech, when the national average price of a gallon of regular gasoline was $3.39. “North America is on track to be energy independent in the next five years or so. This is going to mean more growth, yes, but it’s also going to mean lower prices.”

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